Conditional Sentences

There are four main types of if sentences in English, often called conditional sentences.

These sentences are in two halves, with the if part in one half and the other part where you can use modal verbs such as can, will, may, might, could and would.

The Zero Conditional – "If + present form + present form"

"If you heat ice, it melts."

In this type of conditional sentence, you could use when instead of if. It's always true that when you heat ice it melts. This is why this type of sentence is sometimes called a zero conditional.

The First Conditional – "If + present form, + will, can or may"

"If I am late, I will call you."

"If you need me, you can call me at home."

"If it gets any hotter, we may have a thunder storm."

In these sentences (or first conditional sentences), there is a strong possibility that the first part (coming after if) is going to happen. The second part says what will happen as a result.

The Second Conditional – "If + past form + would, could or might"

"If I got a pay rise, I would buy a new car."

"If you left your job, you could travel around the world."

"If you were nicer to him, he might lend you the money."

In these sentences, the first part with if shows that the event is unlikely to happen. In English, we often use this type of sentence (called a second conditional) to talk about hypotheses, or imaginary future events.

For example, "If I was President of the United States, I would change some laws." But I know that I'll never be the President of the USA – I'm just saying what I would do if I was in his/her position. Note: in American English, it is correct to use "if I were…" In British English, it's more common to say "if I was…"

The Third Conditional – "If + past perfect + would/might/could have done"

"If I had revised, I would have passed my exams."

"If we had gone out earlier, we might have got to the cinema on time."

"If you had told me there was a problem, I could have helped."

In these sentences (called "third conditional sentences"), the first part of the sentence with if didn't happen. So there is no possibility of the second part of the sentence happening. I didn't revise, so I didn't pass my exams and there is nothing I can do about it now. English speakers use this type of sentence to show how things could have been different.

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Okpe J. J.
Thanks for your articles. It has been very enriching. How can I teach intonation effectively?

Jenny
Thanks! Clear and helpful

lem
thanks a lot

Tony
A couple of observations from another teacher:1) It is also more correct, technically speaking, to use "if I were" in British English although "if I was" is very commonplace;2) A variation on the 2nd conditional is the "unreal" variety where the original hypothesis is something that could never happen: "If I were German, I would understand this letter." I'm not German and will never be German.

Clare
Many thanks for your useful observations Tony!

Appo
This is very useful to me. thanks a lot!

Saiful
Is this Below sentences are Correct..???1. She promised to help me if I didn't find the answer myself.2. I envy you. At five tomorrow you will be getting some tan on a nice beach in Greece. 3. I wanted to see her but I didn't know if she was in town.

Clare
Yes!

Murugathasn
This is very useful and easy to understand ...thanks a lot.

anime lover
yeah ! this is so very useful !!!specially to us students ! :)

Mahesh
Thank u mem

andy
it helped me with homework

Kamal
Great explanation. Thanks a lot.

Aslan
helpful thanks

Adebayo Gabriel
This is very simple and straight forward. What a very good and clear teacher.

Sai-Sam
Great Tips! Thanks..

Boston
If you did not use double negatives, the sentences in the last example would have been correct. ...Or... If you did not use double negatives, the sentences in the last paragraph would have been correct. ---Are my examples correct in the form?MY QUESTIONS: Did I correctly word the above statements?---- Isn't it incorrect to use any type of double negative in (American) English? Thank you. PLEASE ANSWER/ME.

Clare
"If you didn't use double negatives, the sentences would be correct" (Second conditional) or "If you hadn't used double negatives, the sentences would have been correct" (Third conditional). In standard English, double negatives are incorrect. But in spoken English you might hear them! For example, "I ain't done nothing wrong" is considered ungrammatical, but in some dialects of English it would be considered fine to use.

Tony
Thank you! very useful. If i didn't read this I wouldn't learn it!Thanks again

Gani
Thank you very much

mayte
If I had Intended to buy the car what kind of sentence is this ?

Clare
Third conditional. "If I had intended to buy the car, I would have asked for a discount."

Pavel
Excellent

Mohsen
Thanks a lot, I find it extremely important!


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