How to Use Gerunds

Gerunds are a type of noun. Don't confuse gerunds with the present participle, which we often use in continuous tense forms, for example.

Gerunds can be the subject of a sentence: "Swimming is good for you"; or the object of a sentence, "I don't like swimming".

Here are the other situations when we use gerunds:

After some verbs

You use the ing form after some verbs such as enjoy, admit, appreciate, can't stand / help / bear, deny, avoid, mind, understand, consider, finish, imagine and resent.

For example, "I can't stand doing nothing", or "She denied breaking the copier".

With other verbs, use the gerund after a preposition.

admit to (doing)
approve of (doing)
argue about (doing)
concentrate on (doing)
feel like (doing)
forget about (doing)
insist on (doing)
plan on (doing)
talk about (doing)
think about (doing)

(See our page on infinitives for verbs that are followed by the infinitive.)

With 'from' and 'to' with some verbs

Prevent / stop someone from doing: "He prevented her from leaving."

Look forward to doing: "We look forward to hearing from you soon."

Object to doing: "Does anyone object to me smoking?"

Get used to doing: "It took him a long time to get used to living in a city."

Prefer something to doing something else: "I prefer cooking to doing the dishes."

After prepositions

"Before going out he turned off the heating."

"I'm tired of arguing."

"These are used for cracking walnuts."

"I passed the exam by remembering the equations."

In some fixed expressions

"As well as doing…"
"It's no good doing…"
"It's no use doing…"

Some verbs can use either the 'to do' or the 'ing' form


See
/ hear / watch someone do / doing

With the verb form do, you see or hear the whole action. For example,"I heard him tell you about the letter."

With the verb form ing you only see or hear part of the action. For example, "I saw her drinking a coffee in the bar."

Remember / regret

If you use ing after these verbs, you are talking about something that happened before. "I remember coming here as a child" – I'm not a child any more, but I remember the times when I came here before.

"I regret not studying." (I didn't study in the past and I regret it now.)

If you use the to do form after these verbs, then you are referring to something in the future.

"Please remember to turn off the lights." (Please don't forget to do it later.)

"I regret to inform you that…" (I'm just about to tell you some bad news.)

Stop

"I want to stop smoking." (I want to break my habit.)

"She stopped to sit down." (She stopped walking so that she could sit down.)

Try

Try + ing = try out this experiment.

Try reading something in English every day." (You may be surprised at the results!)

Try to do = try hard to do something.

"Please try to be quiet when you come in." (Please make an effort.)

Gerunds Quiz

Level: Intermediate + (FCE)

1. Did you remember __ the milk?
Oh no! I forgot!
2. Dan was in such a hurry that he forgot __ his bike.
3. I stopped __ meat about five years ago.
4. I definitely remember __ him at the station-
5. We walked for hours, then stopped __ lunch.
6. I can't get the lid off the jar!
Try __ a knife.
7. I tried __ him, but he wasn't at home.
8. I regret __ her about the party.
9. I regret __ you that your application has been unsuccessful.
10. I saw him __ a whole cake!



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8 comments

Eduardo
It's very useful. congratulations.
erum naz
I highly appreciate this web site as it is too much learn able to me.
vitropez
Fantastic, I really thanked the grammar web link
Maria
Is it 'you can get bored just by staying at home' or 'you can get bored by just staying at home??Thank you!
Clare
The first one would be more common perhaps, but both are fine,
keshav dandage
@ Maria , here is your sentence , don't you get bored just by staying at home ...
Jasmine
Great exercises! Bravo?
Esmail
Awesome

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